RTHK program 'The Works'

Design Trust Futures Studio 2019

Many who have lived in or visited Hong Kong in recent decades will remember the fantasy land of The Tiger Balm Garden, and particularly its sometimes-garish sculptural depictions of hell. It was built in 1935 by Aw Boon Haw and Aw Boon Par, the two Burmese-Chinese brothers who created the ointment brand, Tiger Balm.
The site, in Tai Hang, included the family mansion, the Haw Par Mansion, a private garden, and the Tiger Balm Garden which was opened to the public.

Sadly, in 2004, the Tiger Balm Garden was demolished. The ownership of the mansion and the private garden was transferred to the government, which eventually designated it as the location for the Haw Par Music Foundation. At the end of March, the Hong Kong Design Trust used the premises to introduce a project that highlights the relationship between heritage and innovation.

RTHK program 'The Works'

Design Trust Futures Studio 2019

Many who have lived in or visited Hong Kong in recent decades will remember the fantasy land of The Tiger Balm Garden, and particularly its sometimes-garish sculptural depictions of hell. It was built in 1935 by Aw Boon Haw and Aw Boon Par, the two Burmese-Chinese brothers who created the ointment brand, Tiger Balm.
The site, in Tai Hang, included the family mansion, the Haw Par Mansion, a private garden, and the Tiger Balm Garden which was opened to the public.

Sadly, in 2004, the Tiger Balm Garden was demolished. The ownership of the mansion and the private garden was transferred to the government, which eventually designated it as the location for the Haw Par Music Foundation. At the end of March, the Hong Kong Design Trust used the premises to introduce a project that highlights the relationship between heritage and innovation.